Home Essay Contest

Calling all dreamers, writers and entrepreneurs. Want to build a new life sparked by creativity and fueled by a burning desire to be your own boss? Imagine what you can do. Imagine who you can become, if you take that leap of faith.

“The opportunity of a lifetime is only achieved…..if you act within the lifetime of the opportunity.”

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WELCOME TO FREEDOM HOUSE B and B ESSAY CONTEST.

 




A modest entry fee of $150.00 (US Funds) and an Essay of 200 words or less can win you this beautiful farmhouse style bed and breakfast located in the center of Dover-Foxcroft, ME, walking distance to shops, theater, restaurants, banks, courthouse and many more. Just think you can fulfill a dream for the cost of a nights stay in a beautiful bed and breakfast. Simply click on the ENTRY, adhere to the RULES, download and away you go.

 

A little history about the innkeepers.

Empty nesters Dennis & Chris Aplanalp originally from the West Coast, have owned and operated Freedom House B and B for nearly 13 years. They purchased this 1880’s farmhouse in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine wanting to own and operate a Bed and Breakfast. After a year and a half of renovations they opened for business. Owning a bed and breakfast was everything they dreamed it would be and MORE! In its 13 years, Freedom House B and B is well established with a strong following of guests. After the birth of their ninth grandchild, Chris and Dennis are wanting to spend more quality time with their children and grandchildren and have decided to retire. This essay contest is a unique way to share a dream of theirs with someone else. Freedom House B and B has become “the place to stay” in the area.

This beautiful farmhouse style home with its wide welcoming porch, immaculate exterior, defined flower beds, quaint courtyard and great curb appeal makes this property something to behold.

The interior is as warm and inviting as the exterior with its country decor, antiques and very unique touches. We invite you to “share in the dream”!

Dennis & Chris Aplanalp
Freedom House B and B


What Should Be In Your Entry Envelope when Mailed Out:

1. $150 Cashier’s Check or Money Order
2. Entry Form Completed
3. Essay
4. (2) Two Self-addressed Stamped Envelopes

One seemingly unstoppable real estate trend this year has been the write-an-essay-win-a-housecontest, in which homeowners who want to sell their properties in a quicker, more meaningful, or potentially more profitable transaction "gifts" the house to the winning essay writer while recouping costs by amassing entry fees (typically $100 to $200.) As it turns out, this is far from a new scheme. In fact, the folks who offered to give away their historic Maine inn last spring
—a headlining-making event that seemed to have spurred a string of similar contests in recent months—actually acquired the property through an essay contest to begin with, way back in 1993. It's just that the Internet and social media in particular make it easier for these endeavors to go viral and, more importantly, draw enough entries (and accompanying fees) to make it all worthwhile.

As detailed in a new story on The New York Times, however, these contests are not entirely as twee and feel-good as they appear on Facebook feeds. So you want to run or enter a win-a-house essay contest? You'd better read this.

1. First, the math—The Maine inn contest managed to draw over 7,000 entries, which translated into more than $906,000—or just about the property's estimated value. But according to the Times, many similar contests haven't been so successful. Without enough entries to recover costs, owners are often forced to terminate the contests and begin refunding entry fees. Oof.

2. It's not all warm-fuzzies—After the winner of the Maine inn was announced this past June, a Facebook group was created to unite people who thought the contest was rigged. "Fifteen complaints were lodged with the Maine attorney general's office, which led to an inquiry by the State Police," the Timesreports. (The State Police ultimately ruled everything lawful.) And a caveat for any potential contest winners: beware of sore losers. The lucky guy who now runs the Maine inn says losing contestants keep leaving one-star reviews of the place on TripAdvisor and paying him "nasty visits and phones calls."

3. In fact it's more like a part-time job—To avoid the kind of controversy seen in the Maine inn contest, a Virginian couple running a competition for their 35-acre horse farm has gone all out to ensure the process is completely legitimate. These measures include: hiring a trustee to accept entries and remove identifying details, establishing a panel of anonymous judges to make a final decision from 25 finalists chosen by the couple, and setting up a Facebook page that details all the rules for potential contestants. The couple reportedly spendsfour hours a day reading essay entries and explaining rules to possible entrants.

4. Beware, unexpected visitors—A Houston-based realtor who tried a win-a-house essay contest had this to say to the Times: "There were always people walking around and driving by slowly. If someone else does it, I would suggest maybe not living in the place."

5. There's a site for all this—Carolyn Berry, who's behind the Virginia horse farm contest, is chronicling win-a-house contests popping up across the country on this Facebook page; inevitably, she also updates when a contest has been canceled due to insufficient entries.

Do check out the full story on the New York Times.

∙ All House of the Day posts [Curbed]
∙ Write a 200-Word Essay, Win a Historic Inn in Maine [Curbed]
∙ Oh Great, Another of Those Write-an-Essay-to-Win-a-House Contests [Curbed]

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